Liar, Lunatic, or Lord?: Overview of Lewis’ Famous Argument

CS Lewis is perhaps the most recognized Christian writer of the twentieth century. From the well-known and loved Narnia books to the more theological and apologetics books like Mere Christianity and The Screwtape Letters, Lewis has captured both the imagination and intellect of his many readers since he began his writing. CS Lewis’ analogies, argumentsContinue reading “Liar, Lunatic, or Lord?: Overview of Lewis’ Famous Argument”

The Kalam Cosmological Argument: A Brief Overview

In a previous post, I have discussed the intuition behind cosmological arguments and gave several examples. One of these examples was the Kalam cosmological argument. By way of overview, a cosmological argument is, broadly speaking, one that reasons from facts about the universe we observe and metaphysical principles to argue that God, or at leastContinue reading “The Kalam Cosmological Argument: A Brief Overview”

What are Cosmological Arguments?

Cosmological arguments are probably the most discussed and most intriguing area of natural theology. While there are a great variety of areas of philosophy that point towards God’s existence – we find that, for whatever reason, the realm of cosmological arguments seems to bring the most interest from both defenders and opponents of the arguments.Continue reading “What are Cosmological Arguments?”

Critical Thinking Toolkit: Straw Man Fallacy

Imagine the following scenario. A man walks up to an 80 year old with walking on his cane in the street, knocks him out with a single punch, then claims to be the best boxer who has ever lived. Sound silly? It should. This is an embodiment of what is known as the straw manContinue reading “Critical Thinking Toolkit: Straw Man Fallacy”

Why Ask Questions About Numbers? (Types of Numbers #1)

This is a first post in a series in which I’d like to discuss various different types of numbers that mathematicians study. This may sound strange – and that is fair. After all, aren’t all numbers just… numbers? Why would some numbers be so different from other numbers? What sense does that make? I’m honestlyContinue reading “Why Ask Questions About Numbers? (Types of Numbers #1)”

Summary of “Advice to Christian Philosophers” by Alvin Plantinga

Academia can be a wild place. Despite what people might think, there are often entire paradigm shifts between generations in academic circles. This has happened in philosophy – just two generations or so ago, things were wildly different, and things now are different from one generation ago. I now want to summarize famed Christian philosopherContinue reading “Summary of “Advice to Christian Philosophers” by Alvin Plantinga”

Critical Thinking Toolkit: Necessity and Contingency

In moments of deeper thought, have you ever noticed that there seem to be certain features of the world that are quite arbitrary or random, while other things seem like there isn’t really any other way things could be? Have you ever wondered at why things are the way they are, instead of some otherContinue reading “Critical Thinking Toolkit: Necessity and Contingency”

Critical Thinking Toolkit: The Correlation-Causation Fallacy

Here, I’d like to discuss two interconnected tendencies we human beings have. We like looking for patterns, and we like explaining things. These are both incredibly important features of the way we think as humans. But they are not identical. It is easy to get them confused, and we often do get them confused. ThisContinue reading “Critical Thinking Toolkit: The Correlation-Causation Fallacy”

What Is Philosophy of Religion?

Have you ever watched a public debate or dialogue about religion? I certainly have – many in fact. I am quite interested in such conversations. Although I don’t usually like the heated ones – I like the philosophically informed ones. If you haven’t heard any of these types of conversations before, that might sound strange.Continue reading “What Is Philosophy of Religion?”

Critical Thinking Toolkit: Inference to the Best Explanation

I’ve talked about deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning before. Both of these are important mechanisms we use for arriving at conclusions. The first makes use of the rules of logic – which we can essentially view as limiting ourselves to the definitions of words like true and false and not allowing ourselves any other resources.Continue reading “Critical Thinking Toolkit: Inference to the Best Explanation”